Practice Note 3 – What do we mean by generative?

Because the practice of apithology involves studying and understanding generative dynamics knowing what is meant when we use term ‘generative’ is fundamental to learning apithology. In this new Practice Note the familiar meanings of generative are recognised. The unique way apithology considers humanity’s generativity is then distinguished. For many, this represents a vast jump in meaning-making.

The idea of the Generative is an essential premise for studying within apitholo. The tag-line “Generative | Humanity | Learning” represents a generative trichotomy that expresses the purpose and process of apitholo’s opportunity. The new Practice Note explores the first of these three components.

You can now download: Practice Note 3: What do we mean by generative?

When discussing the idea of ‘generativity’ in the adult life-cycle, psychologist Erik Erikson wrote:

“No other fashionable term, such as “creativity” or “productivity,” seems to me to convey the necessary idea.” (1980, p. 103)

In moving beyond procreativity, creativity, and productivity generally, Erikson introduced an idea that conveys an altruism in caring for future generations; to give without an expectation of return.

In the practice of apithology, what initially appears as each person’s possibility for healthy development in a life-stage, becomes the potentiality for a humanity capacity.

In future Practice Notes (4 and 5) the understanding of how Humanity is considered, and how Learning is different in apithology, are also explained. These three elements together hold the basic preliminaries for gaining an apithology practice.

 

© willvarey