Apithoria 1|4 ~ Necessary Sufficiency

One of the most surprising practices in apithology is the formation of the sufficient question. This month’s new Apithoria introduces the idea of what we need to do before we begin in our questing.

Those who work in research fields will already know how a good answer is often the result of a remarkable question. It is more commonplace in unstructured research simply to begin and then to discover one’s real question, only at the end. Life too can be like this.

What would it be to instead know a sufficient question –  and spend adequate time on its one answering?

An aphorism (and commentary) on this topic is now available for you to read: Apithoria 1|4

In the practice of apithology, particularly for actions uniquely benefiting humanity, the requirement for appropriate timing may not allow for the indulgence of trial and error repeating. For humanity enablements, failure and repetition is not a great learning technique. Instead of spending time discovering more problems, effort is spent on becoming intimate with the paths to prospective generations. In doing this it seems like the beginning takes longer. What actually happens is the desired becoming lasts longer.

To understand the benefit of the ‘sufficient question’ we can think about its alternative, being:

the problem of creating problems that creatively create more problem creating‘.

For many this form of entertainment is a cultural entrainment. We are rewarded for beginning quickly and acting reactively. We rapidly prototype our way into intractability. The premise we started with must then be infinitely re-workable. The quest leads somewhere, but mostly into more problems. In apithology practice, this effort and energy might be spent elsewhere more prudently. We let go of the re-workable, in favour of the remarkable.

The cultural assumptions around the intractability of problems may require that we begin without thinking, continue in a first direction, are intrigued by the resulting impositions, and find value in their incremental overcoming. Without some training to recognise this assumption, we can be forgiven for continuing in the direction (and directing others) into the paths of our least desiring.

The attractive element in discovering the apithology of humanity inquiry is rather than get to the bottom of things, we emerge instead into the blossoming of all things. Our good questions, lead to greater questings. In doing so we don’t run out of good questions, we only run out of the desperate need to find new problems. This leads to our only problem before beginning –  being there seems to be so many problems that ask for our immediate attending.

But are there …?

We hope you will find the one question, that allows you to step into, your ongoing contribution.

 

© willvarey (2016)

 

“The path to what is necessary, is found in apithological sufficiency.” – willvarey